terror in delhi 10/29
Tuesday, November 08, 2005
  Deconstructing Mansoor Ijaz
Mansoor Ijaz, the Fox News Channel's 'terror analyst' writes in the Christian Science Monitor about the Delhi terrorist attacks and the post-earthquake diplomacy between India and Pakistan. Before we get into this article, let's dig into Mr. Ijaz's previous statements/testimonies. In this article dated February 18, 2003, he writes in the National Review:
The forensic evidence of Iraq's deceit on continuing development of chemical and biological weapons is now pretty clearly documented and the verdict is in — guilty as charged.
And
The threat posed by Iraq's collaboration with al Qaeda is born of conveniences in which the contained and monitored Iraqi leader is only too happy to spread his viral and chemical recipes through the Saudi fugitive's established, ideologically driven network of willing homicidal maniacs stationed around the world-a network bin Laden is desperate to maintain and use.
We would not like to insult the intelligence of the reader by saying that both these claims are now deemed false. Further, from Ryan Mauro's summary of the allegations against Iraq, Mr. Ijaz further asserts:
Fox News analyst Mansoor Ijaz has also said that since the capture of Saddam Hussein, a senior former regime figure has begun talking and new tips are flowing in. He could not reveal all he knew, he said, but said there was credible leads showing weapons were hidden somewhere in a lab in Baghdad, and other chemical and biological weapons components and systems were moved into Iran and Syria. He also said the CIA was interrogating a man with proof on him that enriched uranium was smuggled into Iran. He finished with predicting that in the coming months we’d see the proof that Iraq had chemical and biological weapons and probably, nuclear capability. Indeed, new evidence is emerging to that effect.
Ahem, now we have credible 'terror' analyst. No wonder the blog Tiny Vital dubs him as a 'Useful Idiot'. Now coming to his latest article in question, he writes:
The terrorist bombs that rocked New Delhi recently must not be allowed to wreck a painstakingly crafted peace process between India and Pakistan. For years, Hamas terrorists have tried repeatedly - and even successfully at times - to strike terror in the hearts of Middle East peacemakers at the very moments some of the most promising opportunities for reconciliation were at hand. That driving philosophy appears to have been adopted by South Asia's terrorist groups desperate to prevent peace from taking hold in Kashmir during the now almost three-year-old thaw in Indo-Pakistani relations. The terrorists themselves have much to fear in the mutual hard-won bilateral trust Messrs. Musharraf and Singh now enjoy.
WTF is a 'South Asian' terrorist group? As far as we are concerned, all all terrorist groups operating in this region are of Pakistani origin. Then he goes on to make some hilarious propositions.
First, Musharraf should visit New Delhi without delay to comfort and condole its bombing-shaken residents. He was born there and has a natural stake in the city's well-being. A day trip to New Delhi could wipe away fear and mistrust held by ordinary Indians and swing South Asia's political pendulum back toward the goodwill and genuine trust Musharraf and Singh still share.
Yeah, is it out of concern of the citizens of Delhites that he ordered to invade Kargil back in 1999.
Second, Musharraf should instruct Inter Services Intelligence (ISI) to immediately get to the bottom of which militant groups - that might still be operating on Pakistani soil - could have played a role in the Delhi bombings. ISI should start by taking a hard look at Al Qaeda-allied Lashkar-i-Tayyaba militants.
Sure, just like General Musharraf promised the Americans to capture the Taliban leader Mullah Omar, Osama bin Laden and Dr. Ayman al-Zawhari, we can surely expect him to deliver the terrorists who attacked Delhi.
Third, Singh should accept Musharraf's invitation to cross the Line of Control and visit Pakistani-administered Kashmir's earthquake survivors, taking along a massive dose of needed supplies before hard winter sets in.
Dr. Singh is no fool to put his foot there amidst the riots taking place in the Pakistani Occupied Kashmir. Heck, the Pakistanis could not organize themselves even to accept the 22 relief trucks sent by India yesterday. We wonder what happens if Dr. Singh visits a 'massive' dose of aid.
Fourth, Singh should drop his condition that only Indian Army pilots can fly India's vast fleet of helicopters which could assist in transporting aid to earthquake victims. If Indians don't want Pakistanis in their cockpits, and understandably the Pakistanis don't want well-trained Indian pilots mapping their sensitive nuclear installations that lie close to the devastated areas, then find neutral alternatives - Jordanian, Egyptian, United Arab Emiraties, or Russian pilots could do the job.
Dude, India can very well map these nuclear installations using a high-resolution satellite image like it's own TES or Cartosat. Heck, some this is already available in public domain from Global Security or FAS. If Pakistan wants Indian choppers, it has gotta accept its pilots too. Period.
Terror acts and natural disasters are an opportunity to find mutually beneficial ways to improve the human predicament. India and Pakistan's tragedies can prove beyond doubt that human-to-human contact across borders can heal history's gaping wounds, offer an opportunity for peace never thought possible before, and enable a larger platform for South Asia's political leaders to lead not just their own people, but the people of the world, to deal with human crises more effectively.
We all saw the excellent relief work done by the Indian Armed Forces during the Tsunami (they sent in Naval ships to Sri Lanka two days before the U.S. Navy arrived from Diego Garcia) and during the present earthquake. On the other hand, we witnessed the choas that is the Pakistani military relief work. No amount of equal-equal conjunction is going to work this time pal. Despite his sketchy and dishonest articles, his biography says:
Ijaz is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and has been featured twice in BARRON’s Currency Roundtable discussions. He has contributed to the editorial pages of the Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, Newsweek and International Herald Tribune on matters related to nuclear proliferation, terrorism, politics and the Islamic world.
God save these fine MSM publications for having to entertain this dork.
 
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